CA Winery Re-uses 80 Million Gallons of Process Water To Irrigate Crops

A California winery has recently completed the upgrade of its process wastewater treatment system to allow for the land application of up to 80 million gallons of treated effluent on over 150 acres of crops.   The treatment system includes mechanical screening, aeration, and 750,000 gallons of lined sump storage capacity.   The new process water treatment system services wine production facilities that produce up to 20 million gallons of wine each year.   

Integrated Water Services, Inc. (IWS) constructed the Process Water Management System (PWMS) which included the following scope of work:  a) Construct three, 250,000 gallon storage sumps each constructed of native fill material and lined with a 60-mil thickness, high density polyethylene (HDPE) synthetic liner. The sumps each have subdrain collection and conveyance systems, which connect to a subdrain sump for management of groundwater and infiltration below the liner; b) Installation of a 1,000 ft long, 12 ft wide surge ditch, which was constructed as an earthen berm and lined with 60 mil HDPE. The surge ditch serves as a collection and containment element; c) Concrete pad and mechanical screen; d) Aeration systems in each sump; e) Irrigation Pumps, Transfer Pumps, piping, and valves; f) Fencing and site controls; g) Erosion controls and drainage; and h) Construction of access roads.

The project was constructed during the harvest and crush season, which required close coordination between the facility production team and IWS.  Construction challenges included locating, identifying and protecting existing utilities which were part of the operating effluent management system. IWS worked closely with the team to provide a production effluent by-pass system in order to keep the facility operating during construction of the PWMS upgrades. This by-pass system handled in excess of 250,000 gpd.

The location of the sumps and the soil types required considerable soil management and site preparation.  Over 30,000 cubic yards of soils were excavated, relocated and reused in constructing the sumps. The sumps had extensive piping, mechanical and structural elements including concrete basins and other features to enhance the facilities treatment capabilities. Civil work included structural retaining walls, precast vaults, and manholes.  The solids management system included the installation of a new coarse flex rake screen and a concrete vault used to collect and contain solids from the waste stream.

The project which commenced in September 2017 was completed in March of 2018. The final contract value was approximately $2.2 million.